Archive for December, 2013

Low Sugar Living Magazine Shares Sweet Debbie’s Salted Caramel Apple Muffins Recipe

December 30, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I started my bakery 7 years ago, my first goal was to make sure all the baked goods were made with no refined sugar. Living with a physician who deals with diabetics all day long convinced me that sugar was a no-no. Playing around with sugar alcohols like xylitol, maltitol, erythritol – all the tols, wasn’t the answer either. Too much gas.

I eventually discovered the manna from heaven known as coconut nectar and I was off to the ovens. One of my favorite recipes was picked up by Low Sugar Living Magazine and appears in their Spring 2014 issue. Yes, it’s out on the stands now! So if you try it and like it, there are 49 more low sugar, vegan and gluten free recipes waiting for you in my new cookbook, Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats: Allergy-free & Vegan Recipes from the Famous Los Angeles Bakery. If you purchase it before January, 1 2014, I will send you a FREE 1 lb. bag of my high protein, high fiber gluten-free flour mix. Just email a copy of your receipt to debbie@sweetdebbiesorganiccupcakes.com. Have a Happy and Sweet New Year!

Salted Caramel Apple Muffins
Makes 12 Muffins

Must Have
Muffins
12 standard-size paper baking cups
2 cups all-purpose gluten-free flour
2 teaspoons sodium-free baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon powder
½ teaspoon guar gum
¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
¼ cup grapeseed oil
¼ cup coconut nectar
¼ teaspoon stevia powder
¾ cup unsweetened plain rice milk
½ cup unsweetened applesauce
1 small Gala or Granny Smith apple
(about 5 ounces), peeled, cored and sliced
into ¼-inch pieces
Caramel Sauce
½ cup coconut nectar
¼ cup sunflower seed butter
1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt

Must Do
1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a standard
12-cup muffin tin with paper baking cups.
2. To make the muffins, whisk together
the flour, baking powder, baking soda,
cinnamon, guar gum and salt in a large bowl.
Make a well in the middle.
3. Add the grapeseed oil, coconut nectar
and stevia and stir to combine. Add the rice
milk and applesauce, and stir until the liquid
is absorbed and the batter is smooth.
4. Fold in about half of the apple pieces.
5. To make the caramel sauce, mix
together the coconut nectar, sunflower
seed butter and salt in a small bowl until
well blended.
6. Spoon the batter into the prepared
muffin tin, dividing it evenly. Each cup
should be about two-thirds full. Top each
with the caramel sauce and the remaining
apple pieces.
7. Bake the muffins for 16 to 18 minutes,
or until they are a light golden brown and
bounce back slightly to the touch. Rotate
the muffin tin from front to back halfway
through baking.
8. Transfer the muffin tin from the
oven to a wire rack and let rest for about
10 minutes before removing the muffins
to cool completely.
Keep in an airtight container for up to 3 days,
or wrap and freeze for up to 3 months.

Plum Lemon Pinkyprint Cookies for Christmas

December 25, 2013

Today is December 25th, 2013 and I thought it apropos to share my most Christmasy cookie recipe. That would definitely be my Plum Lemon Pinkprints. They have a chewy, shortbread-like exterior, shaped sort of like a big, fat pinky, and are filled with a homemade plum lemon jam.

The combination is exquisite and I eat them frozen to add extra oomph. Just try it – you’ll see what I mean.

Please find the recipe below, and if you would like 49 more gluten-free, vegan, sugar- free recipes straight from my Sweet Debbie’s Bakery in California you can get my cookbook here: http://amzn.com/0373892829

If you buy my cookbook today, I will send you half a dozen of these cookies for FREE! Just email the receipt to debbie@sweetdebbiesorganiccupcakes.com along with your address.

Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy, Healthy and Sweet New Year!

 

Plum Lemon Pinkyprints

Makes about 16 cookies

Must Have

Jam Filling

1/2 cup dried plums (aka prunes)

1 cup water

1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

 

Cookies

15 x 13-inch sheet of parchment paper

1 cup all-purpose gluten-free flour

1 cup amaranth flour

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon guar gum

1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt

1/3 cup coconut oil

1/4 cup coconut nectar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/4 teaspoon lemon extract

1/4 teaspoon stevia powder

1/4 cup water

 

Must Do

1.     To make the jam filling, boil the dried plums in the water in a medium-size saucepan for 15 minutes, or until very soft. Drain the water and place the plums and lemon juice in a food processor or blender and puree until smooth.
2.     Preheat oven to 325°F. Line a 15 x 13-inch cookie sheet with parchment paper.
3.     To make the cookies, whisk together the two flours, baking soda, guar gum and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the middle.
4.     Microwave the coconut oil and coconut nectar in a 2-cup measuring cup for 20 seconds. Add the vanilla, lemon extract and stevia and stir to combine. Pour into the flour mixture, add the water and stir until the liquid is absorbed.
5.     Form the dough into marquise-shaped ovals, using about 1 1/2 tablespoons for each, and place them about 2 inches apart on the prepared cookie sheet.
6.     Gently press your pinkie, lengthwise, in the middle of each oval to form an indentation.
7.     Spoon some plum lemon jam filling into each indentation. Dip your index finger into some water, and smooth out the top of the filling in each cookie with your wet finger.
8.     Bake the pinkyprints for 17 to 18 minutes, or until they are a light golden brown. Rotate the cookie sheet from front to back after 10 minutes of baking.
9.     Transfer the cookie sheet from the oven to a wire rack and let sit for about 10 minutes before removing the cookies to cool completely. Keep in an airtight container for up to 3 days, or wrap and freeze for up to 3 months.

 

Just Like The NYC Deli Cookie – The Black & White Cupcake!

December 8, 2013

 

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Black & White Delight Cupcakes

Makes 12 standard-size cupcakes

Since I’m from New York City, I was inspired to create these cupcakes as an ode to the classic delicatessen cookies of the same name. The cacao powder used for the “black” frosting in this recipe flows with flavonoids, compounds engaged in antioxidant activity, which helps reduce cellular damage caused by pesky free radicals. The “white” frosting contains erythritol, a natural, zero-calorie sweetener derived from fruits and vegetables. So in a world where most issues fall into the gray zone, it’s comforting to know that you can count on your cupcakes to be black and white. You can find this and many other delicious gluten-free, vegan and sugar-free recipes in my new cookbook Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats: Allergy-Free & Vegan Recipes from the Famous Los Angeles Bakery.

Must Have

Cupcakes

12 standard-size paper baking cups

3/4 cup So Delicious Dairy Free Sugar-Free Coconut Milk

1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

13/4 cups all-purpose gluten-free flour 

1 teaspoon sodium-free baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

3/8 teaspoon guar gum

1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt

1/4 cup grapeseed oil

1/4 cup coconut nectar

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/4 teaspoon lemon extract

3/8 teaspoon stevia powder

1/4 cup So Delicious Dairy Free Plain Coconut Milk Yogurt

 

Vanilla Frosting

1 cup powdered erythritol

2 tablespoons warm vanilla rice milk

1 tablespoon coconut oil

1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt

Chocolate Frosting

1/2 cup coconut nectar

3 tablespoons coconut oil

3/4 cup cacao powder

2 tablespoons warm water

1/8 teaspoon stevia powder

1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt

Must Do

1. Preheat oven to 325° F. Line a standard

12-cup cupcake tin with paper baking cups.

2. Mix together the rice milk and apple

cider vinegar in a 2-cup measuring cup.

3. To make the cupcakes, whisk together

the flour, baking powder, baking soda, guar

gum and salt in a large bowl. Make a well

in the middle.

4. Add the grapeseed oil, coconut nectar,

vanilla, lemon extract and stevia to the flour

mixture and mix well to combine. Next add

the rice milk mixture and stir until the liquid

is absorbed and the batter is smooth. Stir in

the yogurt until well combined.

5. Pour the batter into the measuring cup,

as the spout will make it easier to pour the

batter into the cupcake tin without spillage.

6. Pour the batter into the prepared

cupcake tin, dividing it evenly. Each cup

should be about two-thirds full. Bake the

cupcakes for 15 to 16 minutes, or until they

are a light golden brown and bounce back

slightly to the touch. Rotate the cupcake tin

from front to back after 10 minutes of baking.

7. Transfer the cupcake tin from the oven to

a wire rack and let sit for 10 minutes before

removing the cupcakes to cool completely.

8. To make the vanilla frosting, mix

together the powdered erythritol and vanilla rice

milk in a small bowl. Add the coconut oil and

salt and stir until smooth and well combined.

9. To make the chocolate frosting, mix

together the coconut nectar and coconut

oil in a small bowl. Add the cacao powder,

warm water, stevia and salt and stir until

smooth and well combined.

10. Frost the completely cooled cupcakes,

vanilla frosting on one half and chocolate

frosting on the other.

Keep unfrosted cupcakes in an airtight container

for up to 3 days, or wrap and freeze

them for up to 3 months. Leftover frosting

keeps in the fridge for about 4 weeks if

stored in an airtight container.

Nutrition Information Per Serving (1 cupcake):

200 calories, 9 g total fat, 0.0 mg cholesterol,

23 g carbohydrates, 110 mg sodium, 2 g fiber,

2 g protein, 15 g sugars

Gluten-Free Expo and Moi Coming to San Francisco

December 6, 2013

Gluten-free Expo in San Francisco

 

Putting my son to work hocking my cookbook

Putting my son to work hocking my cookbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am so excited to have been chosen to be an Offical Author at the Gluten-free Expo in San Francisco taking place January 25 – 26th, 2014 at the San Mateo County Event Center.

I will be be there with my cookbook Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats: Allergy-free & Vegan Recipes from the Famous Los Angeles Bakery and, most importantly, with some gluten-free noshes to share with you.

Unfortunately, my son, who has been trained to say “Please buy Mommy’s cookbook” wherever we go, will not be in attendance. I hope I am enough for you. See you there!

NPR Weighs In On “Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats”

December 2, 2013

Hi res Book Cover

I am humbled and honored to have my cookbook Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats: Allergy-free & Vegan Recipes from the Famous Los Angeles Bakery included in NPR’s “Here & Now” program’s holiday roundup of cookbooks for the holidays. You can listen to the interview here or read the transcript below.

Cookbooks abound this time of year, just in time for holiday feasting.

Among the stacks on NPR food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey‘s desk are cookbooks for slow cooking, gluten-free baked goods and practical books for fresh and simple foods.

She shares some of the best ones with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

MEGHNA CHAKRABARTI, HOST:

OK. Even though the focus is now on shopping, food is one of the highlights of this holiday week, as we gather in the kitchen to chop, blend and bake. It’s also true that for a growing number of Americans, food has taken on a higher priority all year long. NPR’s food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey joins us with a big stack of cookbooks in hand.

ALLISON AUBREY, BYLINE: That’s right. And they are heavy, too.

CHAKRABARTI: So, Allison, heavy cookbooks and all, hundreds of them, in fact, are out there every year. What did this year’s cookbooks say about how Americans are thinking about food?

AUBREY: You know, lots of people are clamoring to be closer to their food, to know, you know, where it comes from, what’s in it. People like me, who want to have home-cooked meals for their families, but who are working all day, I call this the slow cooker crowd.

CHAKRABARTI: I’m a member. I am a member of that crowd.

AUBREY: Good to hear it. So there’s a spate of slow cooker cookbooks. Here’s one: “365 Slow Cooker Suppers.” The theme of it is: Make it fast, cook it slow. And here, even “America’s Test Kitchen,” the folks behind Cooks Illustrated, has a book “The Slow Cooker Revolution,” everything from barbecue – I’m flipping through – stir fries, stews, even a chocolate cheesecake you make in the slow cooker.

CHAKRABARTI: The other day, I made a vegetarian chili with coco powder in my slow cooker, and I loved it.

AUBREY: That sounds good.

CHAKRABARTI: But I’m wondering…

AUBREY: Excellent.

CHAKRABARTI: …is it – how big is the slow cooker crowd in America?

AUBREY: Well, you know, the use of Crock-Pots and other brands of slow cookers has really accelerated. A big food research company called the NPD group estimates that 25 years ago, about 8 percent of households used a slow cooker. That number has tripled. So, apparently, there are lots of us who are cooking on the run.

CHAKRABARTI: So, obviously, those people want to save time. But what about the other end of the spectrum, people who want to spend time cooking?

AUBREY: Right, the do-it-yourselfers. These are people who, like us, enjoy connecting with food, but seem to have more time to invest. They’re going beyond cooking from scratch. I mean, they’re actually mastering the techniques such as pickling, fermenting, smoking. Here, I’ve got a few examples. I’ve got a book that’s entitled “Mastering Fermentation,” everything from fermented flatbreads, to make your own yogurt, to kombucha.

You know, to some extent, this is a pushback against the long labels full of strange-sounding ingredients. Here’s a book here, “Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing.” And, you know, this is really for the person who aspires to make their own bacon or sausage. I flipped through it briefly, looking at a recipe for maple-cured smoked bacon, thinking, you know, hey, this could be fun. I have two sons who love bacon. The first two steps sounded OK. It involved rubbing a curing mixture of salts and maple syrup over the pork belly.

CHAKRABARTI: OK.

AUBREY: But step three, which is a seven-day process of turning the meat, fussing with the rub, I said, you know what? This is for people who have more time on their hands.

CHAKRABARTI: Oh, yeah. It sounds like a friend of mine who once was so committed to making the perfect kimchi that he made it and buried it in his backyard and had to come…

AUBREY: There you go.

CHAKRABARTI: …back to it four months later and remember where he had put it. Masters of fermentation, there. OK. So what about the other trends we hear so much about? I mean – and part of it for genuine health reasons, like those who have to have a gluten-free diet or choose to be vegan.

AUBREY: Right. And that’s the beginning of it. I mean, there are certainly new gluten-free titles and lots of books that are tapping into this growing list of health concerns, you know, from allergies to inflammatory disease. I think, increasingly, people blame specific foods for what ails them, and also believe that other foods can cure them. So I’ve got this one book here. It’s called “Sweet Debbie’s Organic Treats.” That’s from Debbie Adler, who opened an allergy-free vegan bakery in Los Angeles a few years back.

And I love the blurb on the front cover. It really sums it up. It says: No gluten, no eggs, dairy, soy, sugar or nuts, no problem. And I’m thinking that is a lot to exclude from a cupcake, right? I mean, in this book, expect just a different ingredient list altogether. You’re going to see things such as stevia – a plant-based sweetener – coconut nectar and, of course, gluten-free flour.

CHAKRABARTI: Yeah. So I have to say that as a lover of cupcakes, I was initially dubious about the idea of a gluten-free or vegan cupcake. But not that long ago, I actually had one from a master baker here in Boston, and it was amazing. So, some of those recipes really do work very well.

AUBREY: That’s right.

CHAKRABARTI: But speaking of which, I’m wondering, Allison, how many people actually genuinely cook from these cookbooks? Or are they just, you know, sort of beautiful things to look at, to have about your kitchen?

Well, it depends. I mean, some really are eye candy, right, sort of aspirational. Some are fairly practical. I would put the Ottolenghi books – Ottolenghi is a London-based chef. He both writes about food and runs restaurants into this category of practical. These recipes – I’ve got here a new book of his called “Ottolenghi: The Cookbook.” These are really, you know, a celebration of fresh, simple things. He and his partner, Sami Tamimi, tell you how to make it fresh while adding, you know, Middle Eastern flare with spices.

So very doable, absolutely.

AUBREY: That’s right.

CHAKRABARTI: Now, what about what we might see next year in terms of cookbooks and how Americans are cooking?

AUBREY: You know, I would expect to see a lot more Mediterranean cookbooks, with all of the emerging evidence on the benefits of eating up plant-based diet, you know, less emphasis on meat, more emphasis on fruits, vegetables, fishes, beans, legumes, whole grains. I think we’re seeing a lot of interest in this pattern of eating, and so likely, a lot more cookbooks to come.

CHAKRABARTI: Well, Allison Aubrey is NPR’s food and health correspondent. Allison, thank you so much.

AUBREY: Thank you, Meghna.

CHAKRABARTI: From NPR and WBUR Boston, I’m Meghna Chakrabarti. And I’m really grateful that you spent some time with us today. Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson will be back on Monday. Have a great afternoon. This is HERE AND NOW. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.